Tag Archives: middle elementary

Fun Fourth Friday Future Favorites: 2010-2016

Newbery Medal winners from the partial decade:

2010–When You Reach Me, by Rebecca Stead
2011–Moon Over Manifest, by Clare Vanderpool
2012–Dead End in Norvelt, by Jack Gantos
2013–The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate
2014–Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures, by Kate DiCamillo
2015–The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander
2016–Last Stop on Market Street, by Matt de la Peña

Caldecott Medal winners:

2010–The Lion & the Mouse, by Jerry Pinkney
2011–A Sick Day for Amos McGee, by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
2012–A Ball for Daisy, by Chris Raschka
2013–This Is Not My Hat, written and illustrated by Jon Klassen
2014–Locomotive, written and illustrated by Brian Floca
2015–The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend, written and illustrated by Dan Santat
2016–Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear, by Lindsay Mattick, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

Predicting the future isn’t an exact science, of course, but I’m willing to put my neck (and the neck of my favorite neighborhood librarian!) on the line and suggest that the following authors from the early 2010s have the potential to make a lasting impression on children’s literature with their books! (The medalists also have a pretty good chance, but they’re already getting their limelight in the lists above!)

Bob SheaDinosaur vs. the Library–Not all of Shea’s work was published in the 2010s, but many of my favorites were! Dinosaur vs. the Library, Dinosaur vs. the Potty, and I’m a Shark are just a few examples. His work is funny, and his illustrations are bold and simple. BoyChild has loved everything I’ve ever read aloud of his, and stories about stubborn dinosaurs just don’t get old!

Interrupting ChickenDavid Ezra Stein–Ever since my parents introduced my children to Interrupting Chicken, we have been fans of Stein’s work! Dinosaur Kisses and Ol’ Mama Squirrel are a couple of my other favorites, and I really want to read Tad and Dad now that I’ve seen it! These are fun picture books that are great read-alouds, and I look forward to more of his work.

Toys Go OutEmily JenkinsToys Go Out was published in 2008, but the rest of the series was in this decade, and GirlChild has loved them (and BoyChild, too, when we had an audiobook)! In the same vein as Raggedy Ann and Toy Story, this series of stories of toys with a life of their own are funny and silly and intelligent, and they have the potential to be favorites that our kids pass down to their kids someday.

Tuesdays at the CastleJessica Day George–Day George started publishing in the early 2000s, but my favorite series of hers, the Castle Glower series, began in this decade! Tuesdays at the Castle was the first, and the final installment, Saturdays at Sea, is in my Amazon wish list for when it’s published in February 2017! She writes light-but-detailed fantasy with strong female leads and a lot of humor mixed in with the conflicts, and they have the kind of vaguely historical (but highly magical) settings that don’t fade with age!

 

I know that these authors aren’t the only ones worthy of literary endurance; tell me in the comments some of your favorite new authors and books from the decade!

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The Beasts and Children, Day 12: Christmas with the Mousekins

Christmas with the Mousekins

Christmas with the Mousekins, by Maggie Smith (2010)

As we enter the last two weeks leading up to Christmas, this book about a mouse family’s activities during the same time might lead to some inspiration…and maybe some cinnamon snails!

The book opens as Papa Mousekin starts getting out the Christmas decorations two weeks before Christmas. (I’m actually right there with him this year!) The family–Papa, Mama, Mimi, Momo, and Baby–goes to find the perfect tree, and before they even get it set up at home, Nana Mousekin arrives for her Christmas visit. She and the older children make decorations while Papa and Mama set up the tree, and the children write their letters to Santa while the adults get the lights up. Then they all decorate the tree. Ten days before Christmas is the baking day; they bake cookies of all sorts to give as gifts (and to keep for themselves!). A week before Christmas is spent ice skating, sledding, and building snowmice in the fresh snow. Five days before Christmas, the carolers come around, and the Mousekin family has cookies and hot drinks to share. The day before Christmas, everyone is hurrying to finish up their gifts for one another. When everything is finished, Nana tells the story of Papa Mousekin’s first Christmas, the one where Santa Mouse had to rescue Grandpa Mouse from a snowstorm and delivered him down the chimney! On Christmas morning, the children come down the stairs to see the stockings filled and the tree surrounded by gifts. Finally, after their Christmas dinner, the Mousekins go around to all their friends and neighbors to deliver Christmas cookies, then they return home to enjoy their gifts together. On the very last page, on the day after Christmas, Mimi writes a thank-you letter to Santa for “all the good cheer that Santa Mouse brought to her family this year.”

It might not be possible to explore all of this book in one sitting with a young listener, and an independent reader might get sidetracked by ideas, too–even the endpapers are filled with craft instructions! BoyChild was obsessed with the speech-bubble-esque words in the illustrations (no actual speech bubbles, but spoken words in hand-written text to differentiate from the italicized story font), and I had to stop reading the story to read each word that was spoken by the mice in the pictures. There are so many details in each image that a child could spend an hour just looking through the book and still not catch everything. Then there are the craft instructions and recipes interspersed with the story, and there are even some items pictured (like the felt skates with paper clip blades and pinwheel cookies) that don’t get an explanation because there just isn’t enough space! This would be a great book to use with your elementary aged children to create a personalized family timeline of Christmas plans (maybe opting to start decorating a little earlier and not wait until the last minute to finish craft projects!) to both pace your Christmas activities and to help manage anticipation by laying out what comes next. You might get some great ideas for spending time together, too!

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The Beasts and Children, Day 9: Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All

Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All

Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All, by Ted Dewan (2000)

Crispin and his abundance of both belongings (especially the car on the cover) and ennui reminded me strongly of Milo from The Phantom Tollbooth, but this story has a more focused point and less journey than that one. Still, both Crispin and Milo undergo a personal change when they experience unfamiliar interactions with others, and a dynamic main character makes for an interesting book! In addition, both kids were appalled by Crispin’s callous treatment of his belongings…which I hope will help their minor case of ingratitude!

“Crispin Tamworth was a pig who had it all.” Each year at Christmas, he gets more, of course, and he soon gets bored with each new thing. (The story says that each item gets broken, but one illustration makes it clear that Crispin destroys his expensive toys when he is tired of them…in as short as a week in one case!) This Christmas, Crispin is excited to see a huge box under the tree; the note on the box says, “Master Crispin, In this box you will find the only thing you do not have. It’s the very best thing in the whole wide world. S.” The box, however, is empty. Crispin shoves the box outside and goes to his room to pout. When he sees a rabbit and raccoon find the box and attempt to take it with them, assuming it’s being discarded, he is seized with jealousy and goes to guard the box until he gets too cold and goes back inside. The next day, he catches the same two children playing in the box and goes outside to yell at them again, but they manage to involve him in the game of Space Base they are playing instead. The next day, he skips his weekly trip to spend his pocket money at the arcade to wait for Nick and Penny (the raccoon and rabbit) to come by; they end up playing Store, Pirates, Castle, and Space Base. Crispin is heartbroken the following day to find that the rain overnight has ruined his box and is afraid his friends won’t come back again. They do come, however, and bring even more playmates, and they spend the day repurposing the debris from his broken toys to make a really amazing game of Space Base. When the family’s new refrigerator arrives later that week, the housekeeper has the deliveryman haul away the “junk” from Crispin’s room while he’s at school, and he is horrified at the loss of yet another thing that he believes is keeping his friends around. In the backyard, however, he finds the refrigerator box that was left behind, and he discovers that it is full…of friends.

GirlChild was able to figure out by the end of the story that the note on the empty gift box was referring to friends, and the sparkly snowflake pattern bursting from the box at the end suggests the snowflake and star pattern from the wrapping paper on that box earlier in the book, giving another hint. We all felt kind of bad for Crispin that he thought that he could only have friends if he had things to entertain them, so it was really nice to see how many playmates he acquired by the end who were only interested in playing, however it came about! Stumpy little Crispin with his enormous ears is an adorable little guy, too, and all the more so when he stops being so self-absorbed and starts enjoying his friends. This is a great book for reminding children that friends are a gift!

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The Beasts and Children, Day 7: A Letter to Santa Claus

A Letter to Santa ClausA Letter to Santa Claus, story by Rose Impey, pictures by Sue Porter (1988)

Charlotte lives in a rural area with no other children around except her infant brother. She spends her time like many small children, drawing, watching television, playing dress-up, and visiting the animals around her home. Her favorite thing to do, however, is write. Charlotte doesn’t yet know how to read, though, so she often copies lists, notes, and addresses from envelopes. Charlotte writes a letter to Santa Claus by copying what her mother has written for her, including a request for a surprise gift and a mention of the Christmas list she plans to send with the letter. When she starts to clean up for dinner, she drops several papers on the floor, and–since she can’t read–she picks up the wrong list to include with the letter to Santa and seals them into an envelope for her father to mail up the chimney. When Santa receives her letter, he is a little confused by the list (which is actually a copy of one of her mother’s shopping lists). As Charlotte impatiently waits for Christmas to come, she spends time watching her animal friends in the cold and snow outside, and she worries about them, hoping to get one of the busy adults at home to find some food she can give them. While she is lying awake with excitement on Christmas Eve, she sadly remembers that she hasn’t yet fed her animal friends and hopes that Santa sometimes brings something for the animals. Santa visits after she falls asleep, eager to “see this little girl who had sent him such an unusual Christmas list” and hoping she won’t be disappointed by what he has brought. When Charlotte wakes in the morning and begins to open the parcels in her stocking, she finds a loaf of bread, a bag of carrots, a package of raw fish, a bag of nuts, a carton of milk, and a hot water bottle. She feels like “Santa had been able to read her mind” and has brought her just what she needs…to take care of her animal friends! Before her parents even get up, she is outside with the animals in order to distribute the gifts she has received. And for her surprise, Santa has brought her a farm playset, “the perfect present for a little girl who liked to look after animals.”

This is another oldie-but-goodie in my opinion. Modern enough to mention television in passing, the rural setting is (as I’ve mentioned before) a kind of timeless backdrop; Charlotte could be a child sending a letter to Santa this year just as well as she did almost 30 years ago when this book was published! The pictures help make the story and sometimes include significant information that the printed text does not. While this book could be enjoyed independently by readers up to the middle elementary years, young pre-readers would probably love to have this book read aloud by someone who would let them take the time to explore the pictures and to point out important clues found there. I haven’t yet read this to BoyChild, but I’m considering asking him to find some environmental print to copy just to see what kind of a crazy Christmas list he might come up with if he wrote a letter to Santa like Charlotte did! (My guess is that he’d have a nice copy of the to-update list for our home that hangs on our refrigerator or a note to schedule a doctor’s appointment!) Animal-loving readers might be inspired to make a list of their own for things to help make the animals they love more comfortable this Christmas. As much as you can, help them out–encouraging compassion and generosity at Christmas time is important!

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The Beasts and Children, Day 6: When Santa Was a Baby

When Santa Was a Baby

When Santa Was a Baby, by Linda Bailey, illustrated by Geneviève Godbout (2015)

If you like to read aloud to children, this is a good one for getting to exercise your vocal talents!

Santa’s parents fawn over him much like any  other parents do, but even they are a little taken aback when, instead of the giggle or coo they expected from such a “soft and round and cuddly” baby, they hear a windows-rattling, “HO, HO, HO!” Still, they admire his strong, unique voice and many of his other idiosyncrasies: his devotion to the color red, his regifting of all his birthday presents, his request for a not-quite-a-horse (“like a horse, except it had horns and could pull a flying sled”), the strange names of his hamsters and the fact that he trains them to pull a miniature sled, and his love of the cold. While he doesn’t always fit in with others his age, his parents think he is wonderful, and it turns out that he is: he “follow[s] his childhood dreams” and becomes the Santa that is beloved around he world.

The illustrations in this book have a very vintage feel, yet they are funny and engaging, and children familiar with Santa will recognize his childhood habits as precursors of his Christmas duties. (BoyChild and GirlChild did, and we don’t spend a lot of time talking about Santa!) His parents ponder what his behaviors might mean, and several recognizable variants of lines from the Clement Moore poem work their way into their musings (“calling them by name,” “covered in ashes and soot,” “bowls full of jelly,” etc.). It’s clear how much they adore their little offspring, so it might be a great gateway to reminding your children that they are unique and loved, too! While entirely cute on its own, it might be fun to pair a good, lively read-aloud of this book with a version of The Night Before Christmas; it’s your call whether to read it beforehand to give your listeners some background knowledge or to read it afterwards for some “aha” moments! Particularly good for a read-aloud with children (probably preschool to middle elementary) who are familiar with the standard American version of Santa.

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The Beasts and Children, Day 5: Here Comes Santa Cat

Here Comes Santa Cat

Here Comes Santa Cat, by Deborah Underwood, pictures by Claudia Rueda (2014)

This book is very different than what I expected from the cover, actually. It is told half in words, implied to be half of a conversation with Cat, and half in images, where Cat communicates using signs and facial expressions.

In the book, Cat realizes that his track record suggests that Santa will not be bringing him anything this year (he’s been pretty naughty), so he decides that he will become Santa and give himself a gift. The speaker (the implied person who is talking to Cat) suggests that Cat is short a few necessary qualifications (like being able to fly reindeer and go down chimneys) and suggests that he try being nice instead (because it’s never too late!). Cat, however, is not particularly skilled at being nice and isn’t very successful with his attempts. The speaker thinks that Santa will appreciate Cat’s efforts anyway, and the speaker gives Cat a gift also: two cans of fancy cat food! Cat is happy with the gift but disgruntled when a little kitten shows up looking wistfully at the food. Cat begrudgingly gives the kitten one can of the cat food and is surprised and pleased by the hug the kitten gives him in thanks. Cat has finally done something nice, just in time for Santa to arrive with a present for Cat: an elf costume so Cat can help him. Cat returns the favor by giving Santa a gift, too: a sign that says “HO HO HO” so Santa doesn’t have to.

As far as readership for this book, I think that a shared read-aloud is great…as long as the listeners can understand the signs that Cat holds up. I explained what some of them said or showed (in the case of the naughty/nice pie graph) to BoyChild, but I think it would hold listeners’ attention better (and be funnier for them) if they could read them for themselves. (Amazon/the publisher suggests ages 3-5, but I think they’d really be missing out on what most makes the book funny, and the School Library Journal review places it as a preschool to 3rd grade interest range.) Being able to “read” facial expressions is another skill that helps in full enjoyment of this book. GirlChild seemed to think it was pretty funny, and BoyChild liked it too…after we clued him in to some of the things he missed. Probably best as a read-aloud or independent read for early to middle elementary students. (For more holiday fun with Cat, the author/illustrator team has also published Here Comes the Easter Cat, Here Comes the Tooth Fairy Cat, and Here Comes Valentine Cat!)

 

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The Beasts and Children, Day 4: The Christmas Pageant

The Christmas Pageant

The Christmas Pageant, by Jacqueline Rogers (1989)

I didn’t realize when I picked this book up that the author/illustrator is the woman who provides the cover art for the new Ramona reprints and for Calvin Coconut (a series I discovered in the school library recently). The style is very different from those books–much more realistic–but it’s clear that she has varied talent!

This book shows the story of the dress rehearsal and performance of a rural Christmas pageant (performed in a barn surrounded by snowy hills and not much else!), and the text represents the contents of the pageant (matching up with the scene the pictures illustrate), including songs with sheet music! The picture story begins with final preparations of costumes and set pieces. From there, we see the angel Gabriel making his announcements to Mary and then Joseph (while set work continues in the background). Then Joseph pulls a wagon (with a donkey cut-out taped to the front and Mary perched on a box inside) across the stage, and we see the toddler (a little girl, according to the cast list on the title pages) who is playing Baby Jesus pestering an innkeeper behind the inn set while another child leads some real animals into the barn for the performance. Mary and Joseph have some trouble keeping the “baby” in the manger once she sees the cow and sheep on stage, and one of the sheep chews on a shepherd’s head covering while the angel appears to proclaim the birth. Then an angel choir (with appropriately mixed behavior) sings as the shepherds make their way to the stable (where Jesus sucks on a pacifier and tries to pull off the head covering of another shepherd). The real program begins at this point of the illustrations as the costumed wise men (one carrying the camel cut-out) trek through the snow on the country road leading to the barn where cars fill the plowed out area that is serving as a parking lot. They track snow across the stage while the audience looks on with pride. The faux Jesus has actually fallen asleep for this evening performance, and Mary and Joseph smile as they place her in the stage manger. Then all the cast gathers around the sleeping child for the final song (“Joy to the World”) and curtain call. As the performers and their families file out of the barn after the performance, snow is falling, delighting the children.

With as much charm as a real performance of a Christmas pageant, the text of the book could actually be used as the basis for a production (with directors reminded by the illustrations of what pitfalls exist with child performers!). It is not verbatim text from the Bible, but it summarizes and condenses much like any Christmas pageant would (and, like most pageants and nativity sets, features the wise men–inaccurately–at the birth for the purpose of seamlessly including their part of the account.) The characters in the illustrations are actually based on real people, credited by the author/illustrator on the page facing the title page. While the director’s hairstyle, outfit, and glasses might give away the 1989 publication date, it’s not jarring (or prevalent) enough to distract from the art, and the kids look like any kids from any time in the late 20th to early 21st century. (The biggest hint of the publication date might actually be that none of the audience is holding up a cell phone to record the performance!) This book would make a great read-aloud for preschoolers, and readers in middle elementary grades could probably handle it independently.

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