The Beasts and Children, Day 9: Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All

Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All

Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All, by Ted Dewan (2000)

Crispin and his abundance of both belongings (especially the car on the cover) and ennui reminded me strongly of Milo from The Phantom Tollbooth, but this story has a more focused point and less journey than that one. Still, both Crispin and Milo undergo a personal change when they experience unfamiliar interactions with others, and a dynamic main character makes for an interesting book! In addition, both kids were appalled by Crispin’s callous treatment of his belongings…which I hope will help their minor case of ingratitude!

“Crispin Tamworth was a pig who had it all.” Each year at Christmas, he gets more, of course, and he soon gets bored with each new thing. (The story says that each item gets broken, but one illustration makes it clear that Crispin destroys his expensive toys when he is tired of them…in as short as a week in one case!) This Christmas, Crispin is excited to see a huge box under the tree; the note on the box says, “Master Crispin, In this box you will find the only thing you do not have. It’s the very best thing in the whole wide world. S.” The box, however, is empty. Crispin shoves the box outside and goes to his room to pout. When he sees a rabbit and raccoon find the box and attempt to take it with them, assuming it’s being discarded, he is seized with jealousy and goes to guard the box until he gets too cold and goes back inside. The next day, he catches the same two children playing in the box and goes outside to yell at them again, but they manage to involve him in the game of Space Base they are playing instead. The next day, he skips his weekly trip to spend his pocket money at the arcade to wait for Nick and Penny (the raccoon and rabbit) to come by; they end up playing Store, Pirates, Castle, and Space Base. Crispin is heartbroken the following day to find that the rain overnight has ruined his box and is afraid his friends won’t come back again. They do come, however, and bring even more playmates, and they spend the day repurposing the debris from his broken toys to make a really amazing game of Space Base. When the family’s new refrigerator arrives later that week, the housekeeper has the deliveryman haul away the “junk” from Crispin’s room while he’s at school, and he is horrified at the loss of yet another thing that he believes is keeping his friends around. In the backyard, however, he finds the refrigerator box that was left behind, and he discovers that it is full…of friends.

GirlChild was able to figure out by the end of the story that the note on the empty gift box was referring to friends, and the sparkly snowflake pattern bursting from the box at the end suggests the snowflake and star pattern from the wrapping paper on that box earlier in the book, giving another hint. We all felt kind of bad for Crispin that he thought that he could only have friends if he had things to entertain them, so it was really nice to see how many playmates he acquired by the end who were only interested in playing, however it came about! Stumpy little Crispin with his enormous ears is an adorable little guy, too, and all the more so when he stops being so self-absorbed and starts enjoying his friends. This is a great book for reminding children that friends are a gift!

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1 Comment

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One response to “The Beasts and Children, Day 9: Crispin, the Pig Who Had it All

  1. Pingback: The Beasts and Children Wrap-Up: Twelve Reviews of Christmas 2016 | Rushing to Read

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